Listening and talking

Simply exchanging words with your toddler is the most powerful way to foster language development. A 2009 article in the journal Pediatrics points out that a two-sided conversation is more powerful for language acquisition than being read to or watching television.
Below you will find some key aspects of toddler language development, ways to take full advantage of opportunities for conversational learning, and a few known barriers to language development.
Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler. Exchanging words is the most powerful (and gadget free) way to foster language ability in your toddler.
A few things to keep in mind about your toddler’s listening and talking abilities:
The number of words that a toddler can say varies widely
Toddlers understand more words than they can say.
Toddlers express most things in the present, as opposed to past or future.
Late toddlers can accurately use the words “my” and “mine” instead of only using their name, such as saying “Autumn’s book.”
How to support the growth of your toddler’s listening and talking abilities:
Holding two-side conversations
Observing conversation
Learning from peers
Pointing to and labeling objects
Potential barriers to the growth of your toddler’s listening and talking:
Television viewing
Parental depression
Persistent ear infections
A family history of speech disorders